Is Winter Hazardous to Windows?

Windows are made of glass, which is actually a type of liquid. In extreme temperatures and temperature swings, glass can break. But is a Utah winter chilly enough for this to happen?

window winter

It’s highly unlikely, although older glass and windows such as the kind found in vintage homes are much more prone to breakage than the latest, multipaneled safety glass.

Glass can break from stress at various temperatures, depending on the type of glass, its age, thickness, and many other factors. Breakage is more common when glass isn’t the same temperature throughout the pane, or when temperature swings happen quickly.

Today’s windows are made from a type of safety glass designed to withstand the seasons, and temperature alone would not likely cause a fracture.

Winter Window Hazards

Prioritizing window safety is a smart move, especially when you account for bigger winter hazards, such as snowstorms or even blizzards. Windows that aren’t energy-efficient can be big energy and money sucks, whisking warm air outside and preventing your family from getting cozy.

Upgrading to Energy Star windows during the autumn can increase your comfort for the coming winter months. For the budget-minded, replace one or a couple of windows at a time, starting with those in common areas and bedrooms.

You’ll also want to avoid accidental “showboating” during the holiday season if you have a lot of gifts in the home. Showing off your stunning tree or other holiday cheer, along with all those gifts, might look fantastic in that picture window, but it’s also showing burglars that you have some goodies worth stealing.

Instead, decorate windows with lights, garlands, and other modest fare while keeping gifts out of sight.

Keeping Up with Cold Weather Safety

The winter holidays and the sizzling summer months are peak fire seasons. In the winter, forgotten candles, fireplaces and stovetops can cause fires. It’s tempting to add bars to windows, especially on the first floor, but that can be dangerous if there’s a fire.

Instead, practice home fire safety and make sure everyone knows the best escape routes in case of an emergency. When doors aren’t accessible, windows are the only option. Make sure they are secure, but easy for everyone in the home to unlock and use as an exit.

An errant snowball can pack enough punch to fracture older windows, and horsing around indoors when the kids are on winter break can lead to broken glass, windows or shower doors. Make sure your home has safety glass, and have a 24-hour emergency glass service’s number saved in your phone.

For more tips on window and glass safety in the winter, contact Murray Glass today.